Sunday, November 17, 2013

I want to submit some work for a gallery show, but I don't know what will be most appealing. My photography is all over the place at this point. Which style do you think would be most successful?
I could also submit some pinhole photos....


















To me, the most interesting would be the Polaroid and pinholes (top), as 'll as the light painting photos (middle).

20 comments:

Thersites said...

i'd go with a variety, but "group" them on display. that way, you could observe which "groupings" draw the most interest.

Jen Nifer said...

Thanks fj.

nicrap said...

What fj said. Only i don't think you should "group" them. Or, why not? hmm.

nicrap said...

Nah, ditch the "ho" ... "groupings" are better. :)

Jen Nifer said...

I can submit up to ten works.

And I have to write an artist statement and submit a resume. An art resume!?

I don't know.....

nicrap said...

... and not the artist's resume you think?

Jen Nifer said...

You're correcting my grammar.

Yes, they require an artist's resume.

nicrap said...

...oh no no. I was indeed wondering what an art resume could be; the artist''s resume on the other hand is simply the history of his/her past "publications". :)

Jen Nifer said...

Oh, sorry. My concern is what I might put on mine.

Every time I start to submit work for a show, I talk myself out of it. :(

Thersites said...

You shouldn't look at the show as opportunity to receive direct "criticism" and/or false praise (although you will likely get plenty of that). You should look at it as an "opportunity" to "overhear" what others might think of your work, to perhaps "observe" from across the room what others pay attention to, but remain unobserved, and perhaps get some "honest" insight into what others find interesting and/or not interesting. And btw - if they do "linger" at a grouping, yet are verbally critical, I would take heart from my college motto "acta non verba" and Andy Kaufman's "Man on the Moon".

Thersites said...

My Dad used to have an art gallery (unsuccessful)... but I think he tried too hard to fill it with works that "he" liked/enjoyed. I don't think that he ever performed the "market research" that would have eventually made his enterprise a success.

He spent too much time "gabbing" and "hobnobbing" with the customers.

ps - I have a lot of my dad's work in my home... but then he had this "eight hour" rule for paintings. Mass production of art is a bad idea, IMHO, unless you do "limited/numbered" series and destroy the originals/ negatives.

Thersites said...

"gabbing"... IMO, teaches you nothing. It's the customer's "actions" (what they buy) that generally speaks "loudest".

Duckys here said...

There are probably going to be plenty of landscapes.

Your "light show" photos might have an inside track.

Jen Nifer said...

Thanks for the input, fj. I think there has to be some distance between a person and their work. Detachment, I guess, decreases the fear of failure.

Jen Nifer said...

Ducky, I was wondering if those would be taken seriously....if they would be considered "real" photography. :-/

Thersites said...

Better an "ironic distance" (detachment) than over identification. They say that a lawyer who represents himself in court has a fool for a client. ;)

Jen Nifer said...

You seriously want me to watch that AGAIN?? :p

Thersites said...

just the first ten seconds.... :P

Always On Watch said...

There may be several entries such as the top one in this blog post.

The other two are more unique, IMO.

Jen Nifer said...

Thanks, AOW. I am going to submit a variety. I'm getting more excited about it, but I still need to prepare an artist's statement and a resume. :p