Wednesday, October 15, 2014






I honestly envy writers. I suppose they are (some of them) born with an inclination to express themselves in the written word. And the struggle to express myself is probably a symptom of not fully knowing what it is that I want to say. 

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I wish I could share more of myself here. But for some reason, I can't. 

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I catch myself holding my breath a lot lately. I think that alone speaks volumes.

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It seems like all of my friends (off-line) are overwhelmed. It makes me wonder if we're doing something wrong. I know it's understandable to feel that way on occasion, but regularly? I have to believe there's a better way to live. 

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Lately, my social interactions are with people two generations ahead of me. We eat rolls and drink coffee. And I try to convince them that film is where it's at. They laugh at me and scoff at the idea. I've also noticed that I don't feel a part of anything lately. I'm neither here nor there. But I'm showing up. And I'm grateful for this place. This semi-comfort with myself. It's not fully developed, but it's coming along. 

















Old Time Saturday, 2014
Polaroid Land Camera 450, Fuji100C film


19 comments:

Thersites said...

Gloves. I wonder if it had anything to do with horses.

Jen Nifer said...

Possibly. But I think that ladies wore gloves when they wore their Sunday best.

Joe Conservative said...

Did it have anything to do with hand cleanliness (as opposed to warmth)?

Speedy G said...

The correct opera glove etiquette for the length of glove is dependant on the length of your sleeve – the shorter the sleeve, the longer the glove and therefore opera gloves are properly worn with sleeveless or short-sleeved dresses/evening gowns.

White and its various shades, including ivory, beige and taupe, are the traditional colors for opera gloves and are appropriate for virtually any occasion on which opera gloves are worn.
Black Opera Gloves should not be worn with light-colored dresses, but can be worn with black, dark-colored or bright-colored clothing.
Opera gloves of other colors should really only be worn only in coordination with the colour scheme of the dress you are wearing.
Opera gloves should not be put on in public but should be put on in the privacy of your own home.
They should always be removed when eating, even if it is no more than a cocktail canapé. They do not have to be removed when drinking but if there is a risk of spilling wine on them, then it is fine to take them off.
You should remove your gloves when you sit for dinner and put them back on afterwards.
They should not be removed in order to shake hands and do not apologize for not doing so.
Any removing of the gloves in public should be done discreetly and not in the style of a burlesque dancer.
Don’t wear jewellery over gloves, with the exception of bracelets.
Don’t apply makeup with gloves on.
Don’t play cards with gloves on.

In Victorian era gloves were used as flirtation codes, so if the moment presents itself:

Twirling one's gloves around her fingers - we are being watched.
Holding the tips of the gloves downward - I wish to be acquainted.
Gently smoothing the gloves - I wish I were with you; I would like to talk with you.
Holding one's gloves loosely in her right hand - be contented.
Holding one's gloves loosely in her left hand - I am satisfied.
Striking one's gloves over her hands - I am displeased.
Tossing one's gloves up gently - I am engaged.
Tapping one's chin with her gloves - I love another.
Dropping one of her gloves - yes.
Dropping both gloves - I love you.
Turning the wrong side of one's gloves outward - I hate you.

Jen Nifer said...

In Victorian era gloves were used as flirtation codes, so if the moment presents itself:

Twirling one's gloves around her fingers - we are being watched.
Holding the tips of the gloves downward - I wish to be acquainted.
Gently smoothing the gloves - I wish I were with you; I would like to talk with you.
Holding one's gloves loosely in her right hand - be contented.
Holding one's gloves loosely in her left hand - I am satisfied.
Striking one's gloves over her hands - I am displeased.
Tossing one's gloves up gently - I am engaged.
Tapping one's chin with her gloves - I love another.
Dropping one of her gloves - yes.
Dropping both gloves - I love you.
Turning the wrong side of one's gloves outward - I hate you.
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I LOVE this. It's hilarious and clever.

I actually remember my mother buying me white gloves for Easter Sunday. And thankfully, they weren't opera length. :-)

Do you watch Downtown Abbey? Oh...THEY know how to wear gloves!

(pish...I would bet money that you don't watch Downton Abbey...)

Jen Nifer said...

But I would think that the etiquette in the Wild West would be a bit different...

These folks were part of a group that performs Wild West shoot-outs all over Texas. I have no idea how authentic their costumes were...

Thersites said...

I quit Downton Abbey after Season 1. The classes were getting a bit too familiar for my taste. But then again, I was schooled as an "officer", but came from an "enlisted" household. ;)

Thersites said...

I imagine that Western etiquette would be a bit different... just look at San Francisco. ;)

Thersites said...

As a kid, I didn't quite understand the social hierarchy. As a young man, I deeply resented it. And now as an elderly one, I can't imagine anything more natural and necessary.

Jen Nifer said...

Thersites said...
I imagine that Western etiquette would be a bit different... just look at San Francisco. ;)
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Does San Franciso have etiquette? I hadn't noticed. ;-)

Jen Nifer said...

s a kid, I didn't quite understand the social hierarchy. As a young man, I deeply resented it. And now as an elderly one, I can't imagine anything more natural and necessary.

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All I have to say to this is....you are NOT elderly. :p

Ducky's here said...

The Rules of the Game was all I needed to know about the social hierarchy.

Ducky's here said...

Film has pretty much disappeared from the cinema also, Jen. In fact I think it's hanging on a lot tighter in photography.

When Godard went to video I knew it was over.

Jen Nifer said...

Duck, film shooters are using Cinestill, which I think is motion picture film. You just have to wash off the rem-jet coating and it's good to go.

Also, an Italian group is doing a Kickstarter for Ferrania. They're resurrecting b/w and color slide film.

The campaign isn't even over and they're fully funded.

I can't help but feel like this is a great time to be using film. I have no idea how long it will last, but I'm enjoying the heck out of it.

I think it's a mistake to abandon it in the cinema. I foresee a backlash coming to all things digital...
(these hipsters like their vinyl and their film)

Joe Conservative said...

:(

Thersites said...

from Wiki

Renoir wanted to depict people as they truly were at that point in history; he said The Rules of the Game was "a reconstructed documentary, a documentary on the condition of a society at a given moment".[86] He believed this depiction was the reason behind the film's disastrous premiere, saying "the audience's reaction was due to my candour".[87] The Marriage of Figaro, an inspiration for the film, had also been considered controversial for its attack on the class system.[88] The Rules of the Game remained controversial with the French public shortly after World War II when it was once again banned. Renoir's biographer Roland Bergan said the film hit a raw nerve with the public by depicting "people, who might have had an influence in shaping the world, [but] did nothing to prevent an advance of Fascism; some of whom, indeed, actually welcomed it".[89]

The rabbit hunt scene is often compared to the senseless death that occurs during war; Renoir said he wanted to show a certain class of people killing for no reason. Renoir himself had never killed an animal[36] and called hunting "an abominable exercise in cruelty".[90] Bergan wrote "in the great set piece of the hunt, the callous cruelty of the guests is laid bare as they fire at any rabbit and bird that moves after the beaters have led the game to slaughter. There was no need for Renoir to accentuate the analogy with world events."[91]

The film's most-quoted line of dialogue, spoken by Octave, is "Everyone has his reasons". Renoir's sentiment of objective humanism for the film's characters is articulated by Octave's remark and shows his empathy for the people he was simultaneously criticizing. Richard Roud praised Renoir's role in the film, saying "it is as though he included himself through a kind of scrupulous honesty: he could not exempt himself from this portrait of society; he did not wish to stand outside. And Renoir/Octave serves as the standard against which reality and fiction can be measured."[55] In his original outline for the film, Renoir said he intended all the characters to be sincere and that the film would have no villains.[92] Renoir said André was "the victim, who, trying to fit into a world in which he does not belong, fails to respect the rules of the game",[90] and that André thought he could shatter the rules by a world flight, while Christine thought she could do the same by following her heart.[93] The "rules" of the film's title are its only villain. Renoir said "the world is made up of cliques ... Each of these cliques has its customs, its mores, indeed, its own language. To put it simply, each has its rules, and these rules determine the game."[93] Renoir said all human activity is "subject to social protocols that are less apparent than, but just as strict as, those practiced by Louis XIV".[92] Renoir's son Alain said the film continues to be relevant and popular because it shows the artificial joy of the modern age in contrast to the rules of that (or any) age.

Thersites said...

The entire film.

Thersites said...

Gosford Park with a French accent.

Thersites said...

A footnote.