Saturday, February 15, 2014

Night and Her Daughter Sleep, 1902 Mary L. Macomber 









23 comments:

Thersites said...

Wow! Thanks for sharing. I had no idea that Fall River had produced such an exceptional talent!

Jen Nifer said...

My pleasure. I just came across her, myself. :-)

Always On Watch said...

I noted that Mary L. Macomber's middle name was Lizzie. Named after Lizzie Borden? The dates don't fit, however: Macomber was born in 1861, and the Lizzie Borden trial was held in 1893.

Thersites said...

I noticed the name coincidence as well...

Always On Watch said...

Thersites,
Maybe the name Lizzie was popular back then.

Jen Nifer said...

I much prefer Elizabeth to Lizzie. :-)
It's a family name. My grandmother is Mary Elizabeth.

Thersites said...

I would have thought "Lizzie" to be more a "pet" than "given" name... what's surprising is that her middle inititial wasn't an 'E'.

Thersites said...

...and yes, evidently the name was much more popular back then.

Always On Watch said...

Thersites,
Great chart! I've bookmarked it.

nicrap said...

I came upon a very interesting site today. May be you guys too would like a look at it. :)

Thersites said...

When I want to destroy the world... I'll do it with an idea. ;)

Jen Nifer said...

Thersites said...
I would have thought "Lizzie" to be more a "pet" than "given" name... what's surprising is that her middle inititial wasn't an 'E'


My grandmother's pet name is Beth. Just hearing family or friends refer to her as Beth gives me a moment of happiness. I think it's one reason I enjoyed "Little Women". The characters had such great, feminine names.

Jen Nifer said...

AOW, I know you love that book. Do you relate to one character more than the others?

Always On Watch said...

If I recall correct, Lizzie was Lizzie Borden's given name. Her full given name was Lizzie Andrew Borden.

Back in the 1800s, it wasn't unusual to give what we call "pet names" as given names. For example, my paternal grandmother's given first name was Annie -- not Ann or Anna.

BTW, after the murders, Lizzie Borden called herself "Lizbeth"; see THIS.

That is the name engraved on her tomb. I've visited her grave at least twice.

Always On Watch said...

Jen,
About my relating to a particular character in Little Women -- Jo, of course!

Are you familiar with Little Men? I've recently revisited that novel. I don't have a boarding school for boys, but I have homeschooling classrooms full of boys. Some years ago, one of my teaching friends said to me: "You always like the bad ones" -- meaning, the bad boys. True enough -- as long as the bad boys aren't mean as snakes! I try to find a way for bratty boys to channel their energy in a more positive way, and I'm successful at least 50% of the time.

Jen Nifer said...

:-)
I knew it was Jo!

I think I relate to Meg. A little too practical...but I'm trying to overcome that. ;-)

Jen Nifer said...

And God bless you for engaging with the bad boys! They NEED that.

Thersites said...

:p

Always On Watch said...

Jen,
Little Women's Meg is the wisest of the March sisters. But she doesn't have a zest for life.

This is not to say that she doesn't enjoy life!

Always On Watch said...

I could talk forever about "bad boys." In my experience, they often are floundering emotionally.

I've had some success very recently with one of "the bad boys" in my class. I know what turned him around (for the time being, anyway): he completed an assignment well, and I praised him in front of the class. He is excited to be in class now and racking up some good grades. Just the one moment of praise -- that's all it took! Amazing! I think that the one moment of praise let him know that I do have confidence in his academic abilities. And it's wonderful to see him smiling now; ever since he arrived to the class back in November, he was more somber than I like to see. I'm not sure why he had that cloud over his head, but the cloud seems to have lifted.

PS: Jo would have given the boy I just mentioned the same moment of praise and would have won him over completely. I haven't won him over completely. Yet.

Jen Nifer said...

Fj, :-)

Jen Nifer said...

It's a gift to be able to encourage them in the classroom, AOW. I thought I wanted to be a teacher until I spent one semester student teaching. I realized quickly that education wasn't my calling!

:-)

P.s. Jo might have won him over completely, but she is, after all, fictional.

P.s.s. I often think of Jane Eyre in the same way. I adore her!!

Always On Watch said...

Jen,
In my view, real teachers are called; they don't pursue merely a career.

PS: Jane Eyre is another of my favorite books! The first time that I read it, I was in 5th or 6th grade. I've reread it at least once more.

PPS: My model for teaching in several ways in Annie Sullivan. Just sayin'.