Sunday, May 4, 2014

Lumen Prints II



Dried, dead Crepe Myrtle






One of my favorite perennials, Oxalis






from my favorite tree, the Sycamore







12 comments:

Thersites said...

So, the thicker the object/denser the medium being photographed, the lighter it appears?

Thersites said...

I've seen other examples (in one of your links) of older B&W film turning colour from the chemical reaction... I don't see much of that, here. :(

Jen Nifer said...

So, the thicker the object/denser the medium being photographed, the lighter it appears?

May 5, 2014 at 12:55 PM

Yes

About b/w film turning colors....

. I'm not sure how that would happen. I've seen lumen prints done on paper that had a slight coloration, but not on film. These prints weren't left in the sun for very long. They might show different colors if left out longer...

Jen Nifer said...

I've seen other examples (in one of your links) of older B&W film turning colour from the chemical reaction... I don't see much of that, here. :(

----

FJ, do you think they might have been photoshopped? Do you remember which link (which photographer?). Susan Derges, maybe? She does photograms on paper (it really shouldn't matter if it's film or paper..), but I don't know if she uses b/w or colour.
Now I'm curious....

And I once posted some photograms (different than lumen prints, because photograms are developed with the traditional chemical process, whereas lumen prints are just put into "fixer", no "developer". Anyway, my photograms were just black and white, but I edited in color. Is that what you're talking about?

Jen Nifer said...

http://www.jenbrimmagephoto.blogspot.com/2014/02/i-read-article-today-that-said-that-we.html


http://www.jenbrimmagephoto.blogspot.com/2014/02/i-recently-discovered-susan-derges-her.html


Is this what you're talking about, FJ?

Thersites said...

No, this....

Thersites said...

I don't know if this might be related... but my first impression from the link above was that colour might be a "natural" effect with lumens...

Thersites said...

Or perhaps it's the moisture from condensation on the glass...

Place a plant cutting on the paper and leave it in the sun for hours. My exposures vary from about 30 minutes to 4 hours. I place a piece of glass to slightly flatten the plant cutting. In the heat of the summer the photographic paper will get moist in the area of contact with the plant. That is one of the important aspects of producing color shifts. As the exposure progresses the paper will darken.

Jen Nifer said...

Or perhaps it's the moisture from condensation on the glass..

-------

Yes, it is. :-)
Also, the images in the first link (Alt Photo.com) were "toned". It's a additional treatment of the photos, in which they are first bleached, then colored with different toners.

My prints weren't toned. I just fixed them.

Thersites said...

Don't use that tone with me, young lady! ;)

Jen Nifer said...

lol

You should be used to it by now.
;-)

-FJ said...

:)